Maternal 25(OH)D concentrations ≥40 ng/mL associated with 60% lower preterm birth risk among general obstetrical patients at an urban medical center

Sharon L. McDonnell, Keith A. Baggerly, Carole A. Baggerly, Jennifer L. Aliano, Christine B. French*, Leo L. Baggerly, Myla D. Ebeling, Charles S. Rittenberg, Christopher G. Goodier, Julio F. Mateus Niño, Rebecca J. Wineland, Roger B. Newman, Bruce W. Hollis, Carol L. Wagner

GrassrootsHealth helped implement a first-of-its kind study for pregnant women. The goal was to help pregnant women achieve a vitamin D serum level of at least 40 ng/ml (100 nmol/L) — which has been demonstrated to be the threshold for benefit in previous randomized trials.

The study, Maternal 25(OH)D concentrations ≥40 ng/mL associated with 60% lower preterm birth risk among general obstetrical patients at an urban medical center, was published in PLOS ONE by GrassrootsHealth, the implementation leaders.

This population study included over 1,000 pregnant women at the Medical University of South Carolina. Results found that women who achieved a 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum level of greater than or equal to 40 ng/ml (100 nmol/L) had a 60% lower risk of preterm birth compared to those with levels less than 20 ng/ml (50 nmol/L), p=0.0001.

Format: PDF

Dimensions: 8.5 x 11 inches

Pages: 12